Grundfos keeps Olympic Games reporters cool


Olympic rowers

As a participant in the Olympic Games the important thing is not to win, but to participate. And it almost feels like being there ourselves when watching the Olympic Games on TV and listening to them on the radio – that’s if the reporters are in top form.

This is where Grundfos comes in – playing an important, yet discreet, role in this year’s great sports event.

Grundfos’ contribution to making the Olympic Games a success for those spectators watching it all from their favourite armchair is 60 large NB one-stage standard pumps and TP circulator pumps which form part of a very important air conditioning system. From its location in the international radio and television transmission centre the system is to keep reporters cool in the hot summer weather. It should also come in handy when the fight for medals is in full swing and the excitement in critical situations reaches boiling point.

Housing facilities for 10,000 people, the transmission centre will be the world’s biggest, and the second-biggest building in Athens. Some 50,000 square metres have been allocated for radio and television studios, and the total of 130,000 square metres will be housing a gigantic restaurant with roof gardens, offices and a car park with room for 2,500 vehicles.
The consortium behind this prestigious construction project is happy to be able to enjoy the sports coverage in peace and quiet – thanks to Grundfos, among others, according to engineer Konstantinos Roimbas of the firm Elliniki Technodomiki:
”Reliability, high quality and professional technical support when and as required made us choose pumps and control panels from Grundfos, which thus contributes to the general high quality and reliability of the entire project,” he says. He continues:
”This allows us to watch the Games as happy spectators without worrying about technical aspects. And that is particularly important to us Greeks as these are “our own” Olympic Games, and we would like to deal with it in a manner reflecting responsibility, common sense and professionalism.”

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