Super metal makes pumps green


Super metal makes pumps green

Neodymium is the name of a raw material that makes Grundfos pumps energy efficient.

"Green metals" or "rare soil types". It goes by many names. But, regardless of the name, it is 17 metals each with its own special characteristics. Raw material that will be in higher and higher demand worldwide in connection with the development of new green products and technologies.

One of the materials is Neodymium - a super metal that is an important contributor to Grundfos’ position in the front when it comes to the development of pumps with low energy consumption. The metal makes magnets stronger than other magnets and it is exactly this quality that is used for making the motors of Grundfos pumps energy efficient.

Material with great potential
Peter Røpke, Group Executive Vice President, Research and Technology Development, tells us that Grundfos with great success uses Neodymium in the Grundfos Magna series of large circulator pumps ad other pumps.
- The material makes the magnets in the magnet motors of the pumps stronger and this is an important part of the reason why the pumps use 30 percent less energy than similar pumps with conventional motors.

Mr. Røpke sees great potential for Grundfos in the supermagnetic material.
- We shall continue to be in the front when it comes to reducing the energy consumption of pumps, and the use of super metals is one of the options we shall be using in the future, as we already have the required technology.

Strong partnership
The magnets for the energy efficient motors are produced by a method developed by Grundfos in co-operation with its subsidiary, Sintex, which possesses great expertise in the processes of the production of permanent magnet systems.

Sintex was established in 1997 with the purpose of making the innovative materials and processes developed at Grundfos, available outside the pumping industry. Today Sintex delivers solutions for a great variety of businesses, such as the foodstuff, electronics, pharmaceutical and car industries.

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